Q1 Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency results in abnormal morphological structure of red blood cells

True      False      Don't Know


Q2 Severity of neonatal jaundice can be easily assessed by the intensity of yellowness of skin colour

True      False      Don't Know


Q3 Infants with mild neonatal jaundice can be treated by exposure to morning sunlight

True      False      Don't Know


Q4 Severe neonatal jaundice may result in cerebral palsy and mental retardation

True      False      Don't Know


Q5 Effectiveness of phototherapy is dependent on the intensity of the appropriate wave-length of light used

True      False      Don't Know


Q6 Baby R is 18 hours old. He is noted to be mildly jaundice. He is well otherwise and is due for discharge. G6PD screening is normal. He should be discharged and given follow-up in 1 weeks time.

True      False      Don't Know


Q7

Baby R is discharged and at day 3 of life the visiting home nurse found him to be severely jaundiced. He is referred to hospital. Serum bilirubin level is 480 umol/L.

Phototherapy must be started and an exchange transfusion must be organised immediately

True      False      Don't Know


Q8 A mother who is blood group B RH negative must be given Rhogam (Anti-D antibody) if cord blood of the baby is of blood group A Rh negative

True      False      Don't Know


Q9 A baby with severe jaundice needs exchange transfusion (ET). He is A Rh positive and his mother is O Rh negative. Blood for ET must be A RH positive.

True      False      Don't Know


Q10

Baby M is admitted to the ward for NNJ. He is 4 days old and is on exclusive breastfeeding. His serum bilirubin level is 310 umol/L and he is mildly dehydrated. The ideal management should include supplementation of breastfeeding with formula feeding via a bottle

True      False      Don't Know


Q11

Result of cord blood screening shows that Baby J is G6PD deficient. Instruction to mother must include avoidance of self-medication with drugs and herbs for both mother and baby.

True      False      Don't Know


Q12

A 1 month old exclusively breastfed baby is detected to have mild to moderate jaundice. His stool is pale and urine is tea-coloured. He is looks well otherwise and his growth is normal.

He is likely to have breastmilk jaundice and mother should be reassured.

True      False      Don't Know

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your Score is  point(s) !

 


Marking Scheme

Correct answer - Add 1 point
Wrong answer - Minus 1 point
DK/no answer - 0 point

 

 

 

Answers

Q1 Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency results in abnormal morphological structure of red blood cells

Answer: False. G6PD is an enzyme that maintains the stability of red blood cells (RBCs) and prevents haemolysis when the RBCs are subjected to oxidising stress


Q2 Severity of neonatal jaundice can be easily assessed by the intensity of yellowness of skin colour

Answer: False. Clinical assessment is often inaccurate especially in dark skin babies


Q3 Infants with mild neonatal jaundice can be treated by exposure to morning sunlight

Answer: False. This is not recommended as the short duration of treatment is unlikely to be adequate, sunlight may be harmful, and parents may have a false sense of security


Q4 Severe neonatal jaundice may result in cerebral palsy and mental retardation

Answer: True


Q5 Effectiveness of phototherapy is dependent on the intensity of the appropriate wave-length of light used

Answer: True. Effective wave-length is 425-475nm and effective irradiance is at least 4 uwatt/nm/cm2 . Irradiance must be much higher (even up to 30+ uwatt/nm/cm2) for intensive treatment


Q6 Baby R is 18 hours old. He is noted to be mildly jaundice. He is well otherwise and is due for discharge. G6PD screening is normal. He should be discharged and given follow-up in 1 weeks time.

Answer: False. All NNJ of onset within first 24 hours must be investigated.


Q7

Baby R is discharged and at day 3 of life the visiting home nurse found him to be severely jaundiced. He is referred to hospital. Serum bilirubin level is 480 umol/L.

Phototherapy must be started and an exchange transfusion must be organised immediately

Answer: True. The NNJ is likely to be due to haemolysis and ET is necessary to bring down this very high level quickly


Q8 A mother who is blood group B RH negative must be given Rhogam (Anti-D antibody) if cord blood of the baby is of blood group A Rh negative

Answer: False. Rho-gam is only needed if baby is Rh positive when mum is RH negative (ie incompatibility)


Q9 A baby with severe jaundice needs exchange transfusion (ET). He is A Rh positive and his mother is O Rh negative. Blood for ET must be A RH positive.

Answer: False. Transfusion of Rh positive blood in baby will aggravate the haemolysis due to maternal Rh antibody in the baby’s system


Q10

Baby M is admitted to the ward for NNJ. He is 4 days old and is on exclusive breastfeeding. His serum bilirubin level is 310 umol/L and he is mildly dehydrated. The ideal management should include supplementation of breastfeeding with formula feeding via a bottle

Answer: False. If supplementation of formula is necessary it should be given by a cup or spoon to avoid ‘nipple-confusion’


Q11

Result of cord blood screening shows that Baby J is G6PD deficient. Instruction to mother must include avoidance of self-medication with drugs and herbs for both mother and baby.

Answer: True for both mother and child if baby is breast-fed. If medication is necessary a doctor should be consulted


Q12

A 1 month old exclusively breastfed baby is detected to have mild to moderate jaundice. His stool is pale and urine is tea-coloured. He is looks well otherwise and his growth is normal.

He is likely to have breastmilk jaundice and mother should be reassured.

Answer: False. This is obstructive or hepatocellular jaundice and needs to be investigated urgently.

 


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